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Celebrating a family culture of reuse/repair

1975-veil A funny thing happened on the way to my first communion, back in 1975. My mother was adjusting my white tulle veil. Can you blame her? I'm her only daughter. There's only one first communion, and not a whole lot of other opportunities in life to dress all in white with a veil! Lo and behold, her ring snagged on my veil while primping. Ripping a giant hole in the back. Somehow I remained unaware of this mini calamity or forgot (because, heck, I looked great from the front, and what else matters?). Years later, after spying the veil in a closet, I got it out to play dress-up. After my clandestine playing, I noticed the hole. And came to the immediate conclusion that I must have done it, and holy cow, was I ever going to be in BIG TROUBLE if my mom found out. It wasn't until my oldest daughter started preparing for her first communion that I learned the real story. Phew! One less thing to go to confession for.

My mom had bought a first communion dress at a rummage sale several years ago, and it has been waiting in the closet (pawed and drooled over for some time by my two girls). My oldest, bless her heart, asked if she could wear my old veil with the second-hand dress, after I mentioned I could probably fix it by replacing the tulle. It turned out to be a simple afternoon project. Nothing like replacing a zipper.

Now this coming May, my mom and I, along with the rest of our families will get to see our beautiful daughter walk down the aisle in the white veil I once wore. My mom and I promise to be cautious (and ring-free!) when primping.

I am like a broken record in our home when it comes to Reduce and Reuse. Sometimes I think my words falls on deaf ears. But when my daughter asked if she could wear my old veil, I knew the message had gotten through. It is a blessing to raise a child who doesn't look down on second-hand goods and values vintage over new. Holes and all.

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